Author Topic: How to Evaluate a Paintbrush  (Read 24601 times)

Offline rmichael

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How to Evaluate a Paintbrush
« on: March 02, 2007, 01:03:29 PM »
A good paintbrush makes a big difference in your painting project's end result. Here is a very good PDF on what to look for in a brush.
From Dupont
http://www.plastics.dupont.com/plastics/pdflit/filaments/h81033.pdf

Best of Luck with your DIY projects,
rmichael
« Last Edit: August 10, 2007, 10:10:08 PM by admin »
Pro Painter 30 years ~ Down East Coastal NC

"Hell Son, It's always been about the work."

Offline ChuckWagon

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Re: How to Evaluate a Paintbrush
« Reply #1 on: April 02, 2007, 06:17:49 AM »
That'll help me......thanks

Offline jackpauhl

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Re: How to Evaluate a Paintbrush
« Reply #2 on: April 17, 2007, 08:05:19 PM »
You may find this extra info useful too from my blog. I have a closeup photo of a quality brush next to one less quality.

http://jackpauhl.blogspot.com/2007/04/brushes-closeup.html
http://jackpauhl.blogspot.com/2007/04/selecting-paint-brush.html

Offline Stever

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Re: How to Evaluate a Paintbrush
« Reply #3 on: April 22, 2007, 01:21:44 AM »
Don't be afraid to pay $20 for a good paint brush. It will make painting SOOOO much easier, produce a nicer finish that minimizes brush lines, makes cutting sharp lines against a ceiling or around trim a lot easier, and if you clean it out properly after each use it will last a long time.

I only use cheap brushes when I have no intention of cleaning the brush when I am done. Like when using a shellac based primer that requires methyl hydrate to clean the brush. Throwing away a $2 brush is cheaper than cleaning it.

Offline CarlThePainter

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Re: How to Evaluate a Paintbrush
« Reply #4 on: June 08, 2007, 11:36:26 AM »
>> If you plan on taping-off before you paint then you can use any brush on the market and the following information is meaningless. The following example is for those of us who cut-in freehand without masking tape.<<

What! What about brush marks? I think that a good brush is important whether you tape or not.

Offline Bauer

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Re: How to Evaluate a Paintbrush
« Reply #5 on: July 19, 2007, 10:34:00 PM »
>> If you plan on taping-off before you paint then you can use any brush on the market and the following information is meaningless. The following example is for those of us who cut-in freehand without masking tape.<<

What! What about brush marks? I think that a good brush is important whether you tape or not.

I totally agree.

Even if it is taped off its nice to have a brush that holds a good amount of paint and doesn't look like you used a whisk broom to apply the product.

Offline ash_work

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Re: How to Evaluate a Paintbrush
« Reply #6 on: July 30, 2007, 04:22:47 AM »
plastics.dupont.com/plastics/pdflit/filaments/h81033.pdf

The notes are here!!

Offline jackpauhl

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Re: How to Evaluate a Paintbrush
« Reply #7 on: August 02, 2007, 10:27:16 PM »
>> If you plan on taping-off before you paint then you can use any brush on the market and the following information is meaningless. The following example is for those of us who cut-in freehand without masking tape.<<

What! What about brush marks? I think that a good brush is important whether you tape or not.

Give me a whisk brush and a good gallon of leveling paint. I will show you no brush marks.

Offline CarlThePainter

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Re: How to Evaluate a Paintbrush
« Reply #8 on: August 03, 2007, 12:06:32 AM »
>> If you plan on taping-off before you paint then you can use any brush on the market and the following information is meaningless. The following example is for those of us who cut-in freehand without masking tape.<<

What! What about brush marks? I think that a good brush is important whether you tape or not.

Give me a whisk brush and a good gallon of leveling paint. I will show you no brush marks.

Okay, but why?

Homeowners reading this bulletin board are not all using self levelling paint.  Most of them don't even know what that is.  Using a good brush is always better than using a crappy one.  That's the message that the DIY'ers should be getting from the pros IMO. 

Offline Lynjowoman

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Re: How to Evaluate a Paintbrush
« Reply #9 on: August 03, 2007, 07:04:40 PM »
Sorry Jack, but I totally agree with Carl on this one. Don't try to confuse the DIY's. That is not the point of this forum. It is to help not confuse  :o

Lynjo
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Charlotte Whitton

Offline rmichael

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Re: How to Evaluate a Paintbrush
« Reply #10 on: August 03, 2007, 09:50:27 PM »
The leveling properties of most latex paints leaves a lot to be desired, and leveling (in general) is directly related to proper application. Pros depend on professional quality tools to help them achieve professional results regardless of the coating being applied. DIYs will do well to start with a good brush..
Save the whisk broom for cleanup...  ;)

rmichael

 
Pro Painter 30 years ~ Down East Coastal NC

"Hell Son, It's always been about the work."

Offline funcolors

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Re: How to Evaluate a Paintbrush
« Reply #11 on: September 11, 2007, 06:01:55 PM »
Working with different painters, it is a real treat to watch some of them take a sow's ear and turn it into a silk purse relying on raw skill and ability more so than uber quality products.  Knowing what corners can be cut without noticeable repercussions is part of the acquired expertise.

Have to agree that DIYers can't cut the same corners the same way no matter how thoroughly you try to explain it.
Funcolors because color should be the fun part.

Offline movado

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Re: How to Evaluate a Paintbrush
« Reply #12 on: March 15, 2008, 08:45:03 AM »
Sometimes as well some very good brushes can have difficulty til broken in which for the DIY may not happen. A brush is like a pair of shoes. Doesn't feel comfy at first then it feels just right and performs well.



« Last Edit: March 15, 2008, 11:39:50 AM by admin »

Offline Frankie

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Re: How to Evaluate a Paintbrush
« Reply #13 on: May 22, 2008, 08:54:21 PM »
The leveling properties of most latex paints leaves a lot to be desired, and leveling (in general) is directly related to proper application. Pros depend on professional quality tools to help them achieve professional results regardless of the coating being applied. DIYs will do well to start with a good brush..
Save the whisk broom for cleanup...  ;)

rmichael

 
Yup, work smarter not harder! that's what the pro stores are here for....I have yet to find a better latex brush then the "Purdy Scooter".
hands down the best..
 I have to cut in ceilings without touching the walls allot. and the Scooter is by far the best brush I have ever used. and it's really hard to find. don't know why? I usually just order a box.

Offline PaintingPatriot

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Re: How to Evaluate a Paintbrush
« Reply #14 on: August 18, 2008, 09:19:38 PM »
The leveling properties of most latex paints leaves a lot to be desired, and leveling (in general) is directly related to proper application. Pros depend on professional quality tools to help them achieve professional results regardless of the coating being applied. DIYs will do well to start with a good brush..
Save the whisk broom for cleanup...  ;)

rmichael

 
Yup, work smarter not harder! that's what the pro stores are here for....I have yet to find a better latex brush then the "Purdy Scooter".
hands down the best..
 I have to cut in ceilings without touching the walls allot. and the Scooter is by far the best brush I have ever used. and it's really hard to find. don't know why? I usually just order a box.

Frankie,

Can I get more info on the Scooter, which line of Purdy's is it in (XL, Nylox, Pro Extra, Elite Etc)

 

anything