Author Topic: How to Evaluate a Paintbrush  (Read 28790 times)

Offline castlebond007

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Re: How to Evaluate a Paintbrush
« Reply #15 on: September 21, 2008, 09:02:25 PM »
for the homeowner its plain and simple; if it does'nt say purdy or wooster.....its crap!....get a 2.5in sash tool!  it'll make cutting in much easier.  We pros use flat brushes cause the ferrels are usually wider, hold more paint and you can pull both directions, therefore higher production. anyway, i've tried just about every brush out there so if you have a specific application i would love to give anyone my advice/opinion.  i basically use the following;  3in.blue bristle purdy swan for walls--2.5insash for int. trimand windows (3infor ext. or flat brush if no window sashes to paint)  now, for special aps like painting over high gloss i use a green label red latex purdy 2.5 sash.....raw block/brick etc...i use a black nylon 3.5 or 4in purdy....and i use a flat or sash white china purdy for oil.....
etc etc.................                                   hope this is helpful.......................

Offline jekcah22

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Re: How to Evaluate a Paintbrush
« Reply #16 on: October 07, 2008, 12:45:10 AM »
Use a paintbrush or roller brush that holds paint well and doesn't leave
the bristles/lints together with the paint on the painted surface.


-www.courtneyandwise.com.au




Offline Skye

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Re: How to Evaluate a Paintbrush
« Reply #17 on: August 16, 2009, 07:41:40 AM »
Wow yall,

All the  time I've picked up a paint brush just to put it back down because it just didn't feel right
and felt cheap, I now understand why I've put more brushes back on the shelf rather than
bought them.   Interesting articles about the brushes. I do believe my confusion is cleard up.
Alot more to it than meets the eye ;)
"It takes just as much courage to listen, as it does to stand up and speak"

Offline Skye

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Re: How to Evaluate a Paintbrush
« Reply #18 on: August 16, 2009, 02:23:33 PM »
I did see the Purdy brushes in HD while buying my painters tape, and the difference in those
up against all the others didnt even compare.   The purdy (yellow packaging) are so soft
and smooth.  I knew by the price they had to be  some of the best around, but wanted to check in here first, and now you pros have me getting ready go and get my brushes :)
I cant stand it when a bristle comes off the brush and gets in the paint.   :(!!
I have a feeling I wont be trying to get a bristle out of my painting projects with these brushes
 ;D
"It takes just as much courage to listen, as it does to stand up and speak"

Offline chrisn

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Re: How to Evaluate a Paintbrush
« Reply #19 on: August 17, 2009, 05:24:09 AM »
The Purdy's sold in the big box stores are not the top of the line brushes you can get at a real paint store.That being said, they will be better than anything else there and most likely serve your purpose.

Offline Skye

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Re: How to Evaluate a Paintbrush
« Reply #20 on: August 17, 2009, 01:01:06 PM »
Thanks Chrisn,

A great tip.

Instead of taking alot of time thinking about where to go for the best paint and brushes,..(not to mention gas money),  the "real" paint stores are the solution.   In my area, I have more and two locations  of BM and SW, not to mention a couple more A+ grade paint stores.

"It takes just as much courage to listen, as it does to stand up and speak"

Offline specialkmh

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Re: How to Evaluate a Paintbrush
« Reply #21 on: June 11, 2010, 03:24:49 PM »
I'm going to start painting this weekend. I had no idea where to begin picking out a brush or roller. This was very helpful! Please feel free to stop by my blog- I will be posting my progress so you can make fun of me! haha

My blog is www.downhomefeeling.blogspot.com

Offline Hangman

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Re: How to Evaluate a Paintbrush
« Reply #22 on: June 11, 2010, 07:23:16 PM »
I prefer the Wooster to the Purdy because of the stiffness, Purdy's always feel a bit soft to me which is ok with thin material but can be frustrating with most latex paints which have more body than stains or poly finishes. Firm or extra firm work best for me with most paints.
A man hears what he wants to hear and disregards the rest..........

Offline chrisn

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Re: How to Evaluate a Paintbrush
« Reply #23 on: June 12, 2010, 04:12:51 AM »
Give me a whisk brush and a good gallon of leveling paint. I will show you no brush marks. :o :o

Right JP, this is VERY helpful, just what every home owner needs to hear.We all know that you are a painting GOD and can do things with paint and tools that no other mortal can, but there is no need for that here.We actually try and help people that do not have you're almighty powers.

Offline michaelsaam

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Re: How to Evaluate a Paintbrush
« Reply #24 on: February 26, 2011, 12:19:36 AM »
Best paint brushes i believe in are Wooster Pro Classics. They are firm brushes and if you know how to use them you can almost do magic with them.  I use a 3" brush practically all the time.  LIttle or big projects. As long as you know what your doing alls you need is about 2-3 hairs for all those hard to reach  areas and your in good shape.  I am a Wooster fan for life when it comes to brushes.  They are firm and I need that being that i am heavy handed.  Im not sure if that matters or not but I can use a purdy but i prefer a wooster. 
« Last Edit: March 02, 2011, 08:43:34 PM by admin »

Offline iowapainter

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Re: How to Evaluate a Paintbrush
« Reply #25 on: February 26, 2011, 01:06:26 PM »
I use corona or wooster brushes. I had been using purdy. I have found in recent years though that they don't hold up as good as they used to. I think they are starting to cheap out on the amount of bristles. I have also found that newer low VOC paints are thicker and stiffer bristles move the paint along better, especially on new drywall. I have always found that the smoother the surface the softer the bristles you want to use.

Offline twistdawrist

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Re: How to Evaluate a Paintbrush
« Reply #26 on: March 10, 2011, 09:31:06 AM »
I've  been  trying to  find these Wooster  ,extra firm ,  instead of  just ultra , got  real  hooked  and then can't  find  them anymore, I wish  could  just order them myself instead of  the paint store. The purdy's that  I used to  use  are  too soft for anything  resembling  speed, they are  fine  tipped but I am too anxious to  be  going  slow. Often  by the  time  my  soft  brushes  finally suit  me  they are frozen at the  ferrulle, dripping  like a dirty dog,any sensible person  would  have tossed it but I like  to  give em a  final farewell of unglorious use. 

Offline JustPaintIt

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Re: How to Evaluate a Paintbrush
« Reply #27 on: March 17, 2011, 12:32:10 PM »
It also depends quite a bit on what you are using the brush for.  For example if you are making a dog house you should likely go with a cheaper brush unless it is a featured part of your yard.  When it comes to paint brushes though, you usually get what you pay for.  Maintenance is really the crucial part when you have good ones.
I am interested in finding a good painter to hire along side me.  Is angies list a good place to find one?

Offline Aulona

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Re: How to Evaluate a Paintbrush
« Reply #28 on: June 14, 2012, 05:18:40 PM »
A good paintbrush makes a big difference in your painting project's end result. Here is a very good PDF on what to look for in a brush.
From Dupont
http://www.plastics.dupont.com/plastics/pdflit/filaments/h81033.pdf

Best of Luck with your DIY projects,
rmichael

Nothing new but thanks for sharing.
My fav brush is Purdy. You don't need to know the science behind the making of a paint brush. The more money you spend the better it would do the job.

Offline jjpinkfloyd

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Re: How to Evaluate a Paintbrush
« Reply #29 on: July 15, 2012, 03:54:20 PM »
We stick with Woosters here at (EDIT: LINK DELETED) for 30 years. Cant go wrong. Lasts for years and still draw a perfectly straigfht line! We use Purdy for good dusters! Personally I like a short handle wooden square heel soft nylon blend exploded tip.
Jeffrey

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« Last Edit: July 15, 2012, 09:08:11 PM by Jared »