Author Topic: Exterior Fascia Board Trim Preparation  (Read 22336 times)

Offline ironwarrior

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Exterior Fascia Board Trim Preparation
« on: March 07, 2011, 02:47:43 AM »
Hello,

You guys already helped fortify some of my painting ideas that I have going on for my interior bedroom and bathroom.. Thanks.
I just had one more question on my next project.   I need to prep and paint my exterior wood fascia board.   It's been about 3 years
since I painted it last.  It doesn't wear very well since the front of my house gets all the sun all day.  At this point it is chalky and paint is chipping, just as my wood garage door.   I wanted to ask the best way to prep the wood.   My idea is just taking a paint scraper and scrape off all the loose paint and maybe hit it with a little sandpaper (100 to 220 grit possibly).   I watched a painter once in a similar situation use what I believe was spackle on the wood.  He smoothed it across the dimples left from the paint chips that were scraped off.   This stuff was white and came in a gallon can.  I believe that is what he used.  It seemed like a good idea to keep the area nice and smooth before priming.  This seems would save a lot of extra sanding.   I thought if it was spackle then I wondered how just mixing some 20 minute sandable mud would work?
Sounds like it would do the same thing?

Offline BrushJockey

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Re: Exterior Fascia Board Trim Preparation
« Reply #1 on: March 07, 2011, 06:57:06 AM »
The mud won't hold up outside.  There is an exterior spackle, but it seems to fail on big surfaces that get a lot of sun too.
 Best to scrape to sound surface, sand edges, then liberally apply a clear primer called Peel Bond. It's very thick and will bridge the rough spots and adhere really well. A couple of coats helps. it won't make the edges of the old paint go away, but will soften them.
 Also- how old is your house?   There is a new law in place for pro painters about working safely around houses built before 1978 that they might have lead based paint in them. If it is a pre 60's house, count on it.  Dust and debris needs to be contained and cleaned to keep your house safe.
"It would be ludicrous to think I'm new to this, I know this, this is what I do"  ( Prince and Geo Clinton..)

Offline Jared

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Re: Exterior Fascia Board Trim Preparation
« Reply #2 on: March 07, 2011, 10:58:05 AM »
If you ever have to repair exterior wood which is rotting or deteriorating, I personally prefer Fix-It-All over exterior spackle.  It tends to hold up pretty well as long as all of the damaged wood is removed prior to patching.

I agree with BJ's recommendation.
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Offline Georgie Wood

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Re: Exterior Fascia Board Trim Preparation
« Reply #3 on: March 07, 2011, 12:57:15 PM »
I use MH Ready Patch. Stuff dries fast...rock hard and sandable. It's a long process, back and forth across the fascia several times, but you should get more than 3 years out of your labor/time...here goes...

Set any old (rusty) nails. Secure the fascia with new nails. Pull on it to make sure there is no movement.

Scrape the wood fairly aggressively, remove anything that wants to come off, and then a bit more. Use a palm sander to remove any dead/soft weathered grey wood. Thoroughly dust the surface(s). Prime the entire (length to length) fascia using an oil based primer to establish a stable surface.. You can use a quick dry primer if you're fairly good( and fast) with a brush. Use a brush, not a roller, to work the primer into the wood and recesses. Skim the fascia using the MH Ready Mix, and a 4" mud knife. Deeper recesses might need a second coat.

Sand the patched fascia using a palm sander.. After sanding wipe away any sanding dust THOROUGHLY. This is very important, you want good contact with the next coat of primer with no layer of dust inhibiting a bond.

Once again prime the entire fascia with the oil primer. Now the patch is sandwiched between two layers of oil primer. I like to sand again (lightly) once primed to level-out any brush marks from the oil primer. Don't sand through the primer.

Dust THOROUGHLY and wipe down to remove dust.

Caulk any gaps with a high quality paintable caulk. Apply two coats of high quality exterior semi-gloss paint. Move quickly along the board(s), and don't over-work the paint. Please, after doing all of that work, don't try to save money by buying a "budget" paint. After you're done you should be rewarded with a glass-like finish and many years (10 +, give or take)of not having to repaint.

Note: Since you have stated that this area(s) receives a lot of sun, try to pick a time of day when the sun is not shining directly on the surface to do all of your priming/painting, preferably before the sun has had a chance to heat up the surface, yet the morning dew has had an opportunity to burn off.

Disclaimor: Some will say that MH Ready Patch is not meant to be a skim coat. Be that as it may, I have had much success with using it in the process as stated above.

It's a long process, no doubt. Nobody said painting was simple and easy...well, they say that all the time. Then 3 years later they're (re)painting again. But short of replacing the fascia with new wood, the results of this multi-step process are worth the extraordinary effort.

Good luck, and get to work.



Offline ironwarrior

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Re: Exterior Fascia Board Trim Preparation
« Reply #4 on: March 07, 2011, 03:19:26 PM »
Thanks guys for your recommendations...

BrushJockey:
I sure wish I knew about the lead issue earlier.
My home is 50 years old or so and built I believe in 1957.
The last time I painted I was out on the ladder with my air DA Sander.
I believe I wore one of those cheap white dust masks, but I sanded most of the fascia board down to bare wood.
I got rid of the previous paint chip marks and chalky areas, but did create a few dips in the wood from the DA Sander.
So at this point there should be no more lead left (Doh!).   Thanks for the advise on the mud, I won't be using that if it is not sound.
I did use it on an edge of an interior door of mine. It hardened up like a rock.   But as you say, it will probably chip off.
I will look into that "Peel Bond" stuff.


Georgie:
Thanks man for taking all the time to provide such detailed info.
I will look for that "MH Ready Patch."   Do they have that at Home Depot?
I wonder if the exterior spackle that BrushJockey mentioned would work well if sandwiched between the oil based primer as you recommend with the MH Patch?
It makes sense to do this so the repair will stick well and then won't react poorly to the top coat.

Jared:
I'm not experiencing any rotting..  (Knock on Wood) that doesn't happen :)

Well thanks again for your suggestions.
Today I will prime my bedroom and bathroom.
I just finished using paint remover to get the old paint off the door hinges that someone (names not mentioned) painted on the last job.

Offline Georgie Wood

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Re: Exterior Fascia Board Trim Preparation
« Reply #5 on: March 07, 2011, 11:37:25 PM »
I can't say for sure if HD carries MH Ready Patch, but i'm thinking they do.

If the paint is peeling after 3 years it's a good idea to consider carefully the reasons why it might be peeling. Just because it is getting lots of direct sun shouldn't be a reason to peel so badly.

Are you applying a latex paint, or an oil? The wood is going to breath(expand and contract). An oil base paint will not. It will dry rock hard and the wood will eventually shrug the paint loose, breaking the bond. A latex paint will breath with the wood. Repainting with oil will almost guarantee a repaint in the not so distant future. If the existing paint is oil, it's a good idea to convert it to a latex, after proper prep.

Good luck.

edit: Ah, I see from your post in another thread you are using latex as a topcoat.
« Last Edit: March 07, 2011, 11:43:24 PM by Georgie Wood »

Offline ironwarrior

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Re: Exterior Fascia Board Trim Preparation
« Reply #6 on: March 07, 2011, 11:49:52 PM »
The last time I painted my wood garage door and fascia board I ...
*  Thorougly prepped the wood. 
*  Scraped off loose paint and chips
*  Sanded and feathered previous chipped areas
*  Cleaned off dust from wood
*  Primed with a water based exterior primer
*  Top coated with a water based latex exterior semi-gloss

I explained the situation to my local paint store rep and he recommended that I use the Zinner oil based primer
Then top coat with an enamel latex semi-gloss.  So the difference here would be the "Oil Based Primer."
It was then advised by one of your forum members to carry out with this method but after scraping old paint,  primer then fill in chipped holes and depressions with
a product like spackle but more durable, then prime again so the repair area is sandwiched between the primer, then paint with the latex enamel semi-gloss.
So that was my plan of action this time around.





I can't say for sure if HD carries MH Ready Patch, but i'm thinking they do.

If the paint is peeling after 3 years it's a good idea to consider carefully the reasons why it might be peeling. Just because it is getting lots of direct sun shouldn't be a reason to peel so badly.

Are you applying a latex paint, or an oil? The wood is going to breath(expand and contract). An oil base paint will not. It will dry rock hard and the wood will eventually shrug the paint loose, breaking the bond. A latex paint will breath with the wood. Repainting with oil will almost guarantee a repaint in the not so distant future. If the existing paint is oil, it's a good idea to convert it to a latex, after proper prep.

Good luck.

Offline ironwarrior

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Re: Exterior Fascia Board Trim Preparation
« Reply #7 on: March 09, 2011, 03:26:19 AM »
I've been reading up on that MH Ready patch.
It sounds like it is the bomb when it comes to spackles..   
I'm definitely going to get some of that stuff.

Thanks again Georgie

Here's the description of the stuff..

Smooth, easy to apply and sand – yet rock-hard when cured - READY PATCH™ Professional Formula Spackling & Patching Compound combines the workability of spackling paste with the strength of plaster for long-lasting, professional-looking results.

Shrink, sag, and crack resistant, READY PATCH dries quickly and sands easily to a smooth surface that is ready for painting. It’s great for heavy-duty repairs over drywall, plaster, wood, metal and masonry.

READY PATCH can be used to repair dents in metal doors & siding, and patch cracks and holes in drywall, plaster, or wallboard. It is the perfect patch for cracks, holes and dents in bare or painted wood and paneling.

READY PATCH Professional Formula Spackling & Patching Compound is packaged in 4 convenient sizes—gallon, quart, half-quart and half pint containers—so it’s perfect for any size spackling job!

Offline ironwarrior

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Re: Exterior Fascia Board Trim Preparation
« Reply #8 on: March 10, 2011, 02:23:48 AM »
Just to confirm in case anyone is interested, that MH Ready Patch is available at Home Depot, as I picked up a can today.   8)
Sorry, don't mean to sound that excited or anything, but I am... The stuff I have been using have really sucked.   I always used those little
cans of wood putty that you had to wait 24 hours just for it to dry.  Then after waiting you find it sinks and you have do apply more only to wait another 24 hours.

Should I be creating a journal for all these details?  ;D
Sorry, just bored tonight.

Offline twistdawrist

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Re: Exterior Fascia Board Trim Preparation
« Reply #9 on: March 10, 2011, 09:16:51 AM »
I just dropped in, new here, anyhow, I personally  like  using  featherweight spackle for  nail holes, you can tell 'cause it's the  only one that feels like it  might  be  empty, you  don't need to sand just buff off lightly and it  doesn't shrink much, if I wanted a spackle that  needed a putty  knife  well  then something like that  is OK.  For  really big  holes there's not much out there that won't shrink but auto body filler,here in  Canada  they have this stuff called  dynapatch  that really goes on smooth , pricey though and tends to  dry up  before you  finished it, but it  dries rock  hard for exterior and  damn hard to sand if you got sloppy.

Offline Georgie Wood

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Re: Exterior Fascia Board Trim Preparation
« Reply #10 on: March 10, 2011, 11:57:47 AM »
you're welcome, iw.

Now, with the MH Ready Patch: personally I only use it mostly for exterior work. I don't necessarily advise using it when patching drywall, as it is so hard you must sand it fairly aggressively...which you don't want to do on drywall, especially raw drywall.  If what you are patching is a deep recess/hole, and you already know it will require to be patched twice, patch first sparingly. In fact, always patch sparingly. Personally, I would rather apply another coat of patch than sand something that has been overly patched, less mess also. Allow to dry and patch again as necessary. Always get rid of any sanding dust between patches and before priming. Prime corner to corner/length to length.

You're on your way.

Good luck.

Offline twistdawrist

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Re: Exterior Fascia Board Trim Preparation
« Reply #11 on: March 10, 2011, 01:52:08 PM »
was at a store today and  I think MH is the same as dynapatch, just a US brand but  same thing. I hope it's at Home depot I  saw an out of stock last  fri , it better be a glitch. Those dorks at hd  know  nothing about  need, which is  why they only  carry  four shades of caulk, black , white ,gry and ivory, drk brown,like wow look around  everything in homes is toupe/beige and  nothing  for a red brick.

Offline ironwarrior

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Re: Exterior Fascia Board Trim Preparation
« Reply #12 on: March 18, 2011, 02:44:57 AM »
Twist
Thanks for your recommendations...
I agree, I have used the light spackle for nail holes... floats on like butter.

Georgie
I agree with you 100 percent.  This is one of the first things you learn....to apply compounds sparingly.  It really sucks to have to sand a big area when you don't have to.
But Yes, the MH for my purpose is strictly intended for wood only stuff.   I would never attempt to use it for drywall surfacing/repair.   I've already used the MH to repair some
holes in my back door.  It went on nice and then hardened like a rock with no shrinkage that I could see.  The beauty was that it was dry in 30 minutes.  I sanded it down with 220 and it was smooth as a babies butt.   I rubbed my fingers across and could feel no imperfections of the surface at all.     Now going to paint the door.  Next project with the MH will be on my front fascia boards.
I don't have huge damage, but a bit of paint chipping and oxidizing.    The MH should work great to fill all the imperfections so I can use semi-gloss.   There is one vertical gaps though where my two fascia boards meet.  I would say the gap is about 1/8 to 1/4.   I'm wondering if MH would be the best choice to fix that as well? 

Offline Georgie Wood

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Re: Exterior Fascia Board Trim Preparation
« Reply #13 on: March 18, 2011, 09:18:11 AM »
I'm glad the Ready Patch is working out for you.

That gap: I wouldn't recommend the ready patch for the gap. The boards on either side of the gap will breath with weather changes, expand and contract. The ready patch will not, and will crack, opening up to a crack once more. Rainwater will then deteriorate the ready patch. The gap needs to be caulked. The caulk will expand with the wood. As always, use high quality caulk/materials. Cheap caulk may also crack.

If there is a gap water has likely been wicking into the ends of each board, so the paint is probably failing on both sides of the gap. Do your prep work, scraping(somewhat lightly so as not to damage the ends of each board), sand, dust, etc. Then secure each board on either side of the gap with finish nails. Don't skip the nails, you want to prevent any movement in the boards as much as possible. If patching is necessary(other than filling the nail holes), patch right up to the gap without entering it. Sand again and prime the entire boards from length to length/end to end. Then you are ready to caulk the gap. Pressure washing with the use of a cleaning solution and sufficient dry-time is also highly recommended prior to beginning any of the work.

Please, be careful up on the ladder. Carrying all those tools can be dangerous for someone who is not experienced. Don't get wrapped up in extension cords that you may be using to gain power to a sander. And always remember that you are on a ladder. That might sound like silly advice. But after you're up there for a while with your mind occupied on work it is indeed possible that you can become too comfortable and make a bad move, possibly resulting in serious injury.

Offline Jared

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Re: Exterior Fascia Board Trim Preparation
« Reply #14 on: March 18, 2011, 12:04:29 PM »
An excellent reply, Georgie.  100% agreed.


Quote
The gap needs to be caulked. The caulk will expand with the wood. As always, use high quality caulk/materials. Cheap caulk may also crack.

If you've never used it, try a tube of Lexel - dead crystal clear, acts like a super-stiff silicone on steroids.  Totally paintable and it will never unzip.  A bit tricky to tool though, and it has a strong solvent smell, but as bulletproof as caulk gets.
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