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Professional Painters => Professional Painters and associated Trades Forum => Topic started by: Jake on November 30, 2008, 03:38:50 PM

Title: Jake's Tips-N-Tricks Thread
Post by: Jake on November 30, 2008, 03:38:50 PM
What are some of your good ideas to make a job easier??

Here's one I've personaly seen in action courtesy of MattG that I can attest too.

How many of you when doing a fairly big sized project that requires a lot of taping... Misplace your tape? Or have to go up and down a ladder for tape? Or whatever other thing it is that p!sses you off about that roll of tape?

Matt uses a wallet chain and always just runs the chain through the roll of tape and there it is... Always by your side.

I tried it and it's a killer idea.

Super handy, works great, and you never lose the roll.  :D

What are some of your more obvious but seldom thought of tricks of the trade for making the job run a little bit more smoothly?
Title: Re: Good Ideas...
Post by: BrushJockey on November 30, 2008, 04:08:36 PM
Good idea about thread, Jake! I've got lots of my "work tweeks" spread throughout this place.

Just gave a couple to Georgie on the injury thread ( folding stepstool, use a lightwieght tool belt) - BTW, the tool belt I use has a velcro strap for tape like you mentioned.

 My florescent light boxes are really handy, particularly for these winter days.
http://www.painterforum.com/yabbse/index.php/topic,1401.0.html (http://www.painterforum.com/yabbse/index.php/topic,1401.0.html)

 I have adaptations on the vac sander that uses a bucket with a filter before the vac to capture most the dust.
http://www.painterforum.com/yabbse/index.php/topic,2500.0.html (http://www.painterforum.com/yabbse/index.php/topic,2500.0.html)

Title: Re: Good Ideas...
Post by: Jake on November 30, 2008, 04:22:01 PM
WOW! I REALLY like that florescent light box idea!!!!!!

I'm so sick of the small lights that heat up to a million degrees and are super hazardous to work around, especialy if you're partial to wearing cut off whites as I am when working.
I knew a guy once that burned his leg pretty bad... Don't want that to happen to anyone else again!!!

Great idea!!!

Title: Re: Good Ideas...
Post by: canadianpainter on November 30, 2008, 06:23:09 PM
One of the simplest things I do is bring a bag full of all the things I might need.  I bought one of these bags (http://"http://www.homedepot.ca/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/CatalogSearchResultView?D=948011&Ntt=948011&catalogId=10051&langId=-15&storeId=10051&Dx=mode+matchallpartial&Ntx=mode+matchall&recN=0&N=0&Ntk=P_PartNumber") and I keep it stocked with tape, knives, putty, screwdrivers, putty knives, sanding blocks, caulk etc and I use a five gallon pale to carry brushes, frames, rollers etc.  I find that bringing these two things with me save me having to run back to the truck for things. 

When I'm spraying for a few days in a row I won't clean my sprayer everyday.  I simply wrap a damp cloth around my gun and put a plastic bag over it and add a thin layer of water overtop of the paint so it doesn't dry. I'll also wrap my rollers in plastic for the night so I don't have to clean them.

Another thing I do is always carry a utility knife, a razorblade and a sanding block with me.  At the end of the day I keep them with my keys so I never forget them.



Title: Re: Good Ideas...
Post by: the PAINTSMITH on November 30, 2008, 06:33:20 PM
Jake, good on ya....I'm thinkin' sticky on this topic...
Title: Re: Jake's Tips-N-Tricks Thread
Post by: ProWallGuy on November 30, 2008, 06:48:57 PM
Spray some WD40 on a rag, and wipe down the end caps and metal arms of your rollers before dipping it in paint. After the job, the paint will clean off easily. Literally wipe off. Keeps roller frames brand new looking. Also spray the inside cage.

When finished with a 5, use a screwdriver to pry out the rubber seal around the inside of the lid. This works great to hold a piece of plastic over your current paint 5 over night (or during lunch, or over a weekend) while on a job. You can throw a wet rag over the 5, then cut a piece of plastic to cover the whole top, and the rubber seal works like the perfect sized rubber band. Keeps paint fresh for a couple days like this.

When using premix mud, never mix or pull mud out of the 5 it comes in. Scoop out a portion at a time into another clean 5, add a splash of water and dish detergent, and mix it with a drill/paddle. If you mix it in the original 5, or pour off that water, it will dry around the edges, and get chunky. Also always wipe off the inside of the lid when you crack it open to keep the residue from drying out and falling in the mud.

Also sometimes I put a shot of food coloring into the mud I'm using so I can see the repairs on the wall/ceiling. I hate when I'm painting and I find an un-sanded patch that I couldn't see or just plain missed while sanding. Make sure not to put too much coloring in there that it makes it tough for the paint to cover.

When I buy new metal screens for a set-up, I hit them with 2-3 coats high gloss oil from a rattlecan. After the job, throw the screen in a 5 of water, the paint peels off like a skin. Ready for the next job.

Next!
Title: Re: Jake's Tips-N-Tricks Thread
Post by: Jake on November 30, 2008, 07:43:58 PM
Tim,

Awesome stuff!

In addition to the ring for a rubber band...

If you're just rolling out to get some lunch, or even overnight, a super quick way to seal some plastic over a 5 or even over a cut bucket...

Dip your finger in the paint and run it around the top edge of the bucket. Then just lay a sheet of plastic over the top. The wet paint will adhere to the plastic and make a seal. If you've got a roller set up on the screen in the bucket, just make a small hole for the frame handle to go through the plastic and you're ready to leave. Works great!

Works especialy great with these plastic bags that Matt and I got from a job. They fit perfectly over the top of the 5 and with the paint seal above.... Awesome-ness!  :)
Title: Re: Jake's Tips-N-Tricks Thread
Post by: Jake on November 30, 2008, 07:52:24 PM
Here's a couple for when you happen to have a masker and some paper handy...

If you've lost or otherwise damaged the paper cover that comes with a brush, you can make a sweet little cover for your brush out of masking paper.

Say you've got a 3" sash brush... Pull a sheet of paper about 9-10" or so off of the masker. Lay the paper down flat with the tape side up. Take your brush and lay it on the end of the paper along the metal part. Roll the paper so it(and the tape) wraps around the metal and the bristles. When it's all rolled, fold the paper down over and around the sash angle and tape it up with some masking tape. Now you have a protective brush cover. Works for flat brushes too!  :)

Also if you're working on tile or concrete or any other smooth flat surface and you have some sweeping to do...

Simply tape down a couple of peices (of paper from a masker) overlapping front to back , and sweep whatever it is your sweeping onto the paper and fold it up. There you have the best, most amazing dustpan ever!  :)

Awesome stuff guys... Keep em coming!!!  :D
Title: Re: Jake's Tips-N-Tricks Thread
Post by: MattG on December 04, 2008, 01:21:05 PM
Notice the super cool and handy tape holder (wallet chain) on my left side. :-)
(http://i331.photobucket.com/albums/l449/Ampucia/van.jpg)

Matt
Title: Re: Jake's Tips-N-Tricks Thread
Post by: Vin on December 04, 2008, 07:48:53 PM
Good stuff guys.

Whelp my contribution is that i use a plastic tool box to store my brush's, extra's go in the bottom and the top storage area are my regular use brush's they lay nice and flat or I can stack them without them becoming damaged I have also drilled holes in the lid of the box so no condensation gets built up keeping the brushs wet they are almost always dry by the next day.

All my rollers go into a square kitty liter bucket with a half lid that folds open I'll have to see which company of kitty liter makes that particular bucket it opens and closes real easy and I throw it all the way back of my truck and retrieve it with a pole through the handle

HOW ABOUT THAT  ;D.


Title: Re: Jake's Tips-N-Tricks Thread
Post by: thebrushand on December 08, 2008, 08:12:18 AM
Notice the super cool and handy tape holder (wallet chain) on my left side. :-)
(http://i331.photobucket.com/albums/l449/Ampucia/van.jpg)

Matt

No offence but I prefer this solution to the masking tape question http://www.rd.com/images/tfhimport/2001/Nov01_Handy_Hints_Special/20011101_Handy_Hints_Special_page003img003_size2.jpg
Title: Re: Jake's Tips-N-Tricks Thread
Post by: Jake on December 08, 2008, 10:46:51 AM
Niiiiiiiiiiiiiice!!!!!!!!!  ;D
Title: Re: Jake's Tips-N-Tricks Thread
Post by: Jake on December 11, 2008, 05:43:48 PM
OK... Here's a couple more...

When spraying an interior, especialy an interior with textured walls, (EDIT,on rereading I want to stipulate that this particular technique with the paper is for use on textured walls) it's often easy to get some sags here and there... When you notice a sag and it's still wet, take some masking paper and wad it into a ball. Take that ball of masking paper and pound the you-know-what out of the sag. Then re-spray that area. Works KILLER!

Along the same lines... I had an old-timer helping me with a small job yesterday and today. When we finished today I rolled with him to a Taco Bell where he does odds and ends painting jobs (actualy he has accounts at a bunch of Taco Bells)

Today I helped him spray out the metal doors that lead to the garbage bins as well as a huge electrical box. We were using oil on a smooth metal surface when I commented to him that he had some sags (we all know how easy it is to get those when spraying metal or other smooth surfaces)

Anyway what he did to fix them was like above... But for oil on a smooth surface, he took a peice of masking tape, stuck it to the wet sag, and simply lifted the sag off with it.

Amazing these simple tricks and how well they work!!!  ;)
Title: Re: Jake's Tips-N-Tricks Thread
Post by: Vin on December 12, 2008, 01:11:30 AM
I worked with a guy who had small enough hands to put the tape roll around his wrist, me I got hands more like paws.

Sags ? whats a sag  :-*



 dry sand works good for  getting up fresh paint spills talking exterior situations here, concrete asphalt but you have to do it really fast so I always keep a bag handy on jobs.
Title: Re: Jake's Tips-N-Tricks Thread
Post by: Jake on December 12, 2008, 09:05:28 AM
Hey Vin!

A sag is what you might call a run...

It's where the paint build up is too heavy and it starts to "sag"

The way I learned to call em is, it's a run when brushing and rolling, and a sag when spraying.

Then again, The crew I started with back in the day called holidays, skips...

Anyway you know what I mean.

So I guess it's just semantics. :)
Title: Re: Jake's Tips-N-Tricks Thread
Post by: Crestwood on December 31, 2008, 02:36:19 PM
Store your artist's brushes for fine touch-up work in a toothbrush holder. Keeps them all together and well-protected, too. Snip the handles shorter if they're too long, and mark the bristle end of the case with permanent marker so you don't store it upside down and damage the bristles.
Title: Re: Jake's Tips-N-Tricks Thread
Post by: Vin on January 03, 2009, 10:59:39 AM
I just buy them as I need them crestwood so thats a great idea using the toothbrush holder thanks.


I call them sags too Jake but only when they look like droops LOL or puddles or waves ;D runs are thinner OH yeah semantics heh heh
Title: Re: Jake's Tips-N-Tricks Thread
Post by: Vin on January 09, 2009, 02:06:43 AM
In this cold weather and using canned texture I warm the can of texture in sink full of warm water for 5-10 minutes, this loosen and warms the texture in the can and it works much better for texturing applications.
Title: Re: Jake's Tips-N-Tricks Thread
Post by: ProWallGuy on January 09, 2009, 08:45:55 AM
Figured I'd post this here too so it wouldn't get lost in the other thread.
To fill a 5'er from a shallow sink, we use the cardboard core from a roll of commercial vinyl.

(http://i60.photobucket.com/albums/h10/prowallguy/Fusion_Monsanto083.jpg)
Title: Re: Jake's Tips-N-Tricks Thread
Post by: Crestwood on January 14, 2009, 09:04:10 PM
I use this moving company neoprene (think wetsuit) floor runner to protect floors. Only 1/8" thick but doesn't shift under foot traffic, sweeps clean - just great if you're going to be working in the same area for a while. Nylon fabric on top cleans easily and is durable. "New Havenís floor runner is safe to use. Will not slip or slide on most surfaces. Even clings to steps. Less tangle under dolly wheels or when walked upon. Protects valuable carpet, tiled or polished floors. Unrolls and re-rolls easily. Wipes clean with damp cloth."

newhaven-usa.com item #NH786-15 ($38)
Roll out the red carpet.
Title: Re: Jake's Tips-N-Tricks Thread
Post by: BrushJockey on January 14, 2009, 10:40:01 PM
In this cold weather and using canned texture I warm the can of texture in sink full of warm water for 5-10 minutes, this loosen and warms the texture in the can and it works much better for texturing applications.

Ha ! Just gotta say, tonight is going to be -21!  That can of texture MIGHT warm up in hot water in an hour!
 :o
Us deep cold weather guys have to haul freezables out even if its just going to be a couple of hours. I have a tall square litter bucket that I keep plastic bottles of about 5-6 different primers in ,and it moves in and out a lot.
Title: Re: Jake's Tips-N-Tricks Thread
Post by: BrushJockey on January 31, 2009, 09:21:30 AM
Back to tricks--
 My Trick for removing wallpaper:

Soak the wall good ( nuther hint- i have a cheap floor sponge mop I cut the handle down to 3'- gets it wet with way less work than a hand held sponge- more control than a bug sprayer. ) , then cut sections of thin poly about 4' wide and press to wall. It wants to stick to wet hands, so use a 6" blade to help press to wet wall. overlap your 4' wide sections .It will hold the moisture in without evaporating and get a deep soak. Pull off 1 section and work it. Timing is everything.
  I never use a paper tiger. You want to be able to get as big of pieces as you can, and besides ruining the wall they cut the paper into tiny bits.
  Once again- timing is everything.
(http://i42.photobucket.com/albums/e343/Congahead/Number2/Stripping9.jpg)

(http://i42.photobucket.com/albums/e343/Congahead/Number2/Stripping8.jpg)
Title: Re: Jake's Tips-N-Tricks Thread
Post by: Jake on February 10, 2009, 10:50:02 PM
Here's a sweet new trick I just learned today from a 20 year vet and I think it's pretty cool...

"Smooth edge cut bucket from a gallon can."

If you've ever cut from a gallon can, you know that paint gets in the lip, it's messy because of the lip, the lip sucks (no pun intended).... etc.

If you're right handed, take the pointed end of your 5 in 1... place the palm of your left hand in the part of the 5 you scrape naps with, punch it into the lip of a can like you're using an old time can opener, and simply (just like those old can openers) sort of see/saw it around the lip.

Be careful when you get to the end as you can easily cut yourself when the lip comes off of the edge.

Take the blade of your 5 and smooth any jagged edges down.

Viola... Smooth and easy cut bucket in about 30 seconds.

Tried it today and it worked great!  8)

Title: Re: Jake's Tips-N-Tricks Thread
Post by: BrushJockey on February 25, 2009, 04:18:22 PM
Tip for getting the uber primers off your hands at the end of the day. Slather up a bunch of handlotion and let it soften the paint for 10-15 min before trying to clean off. And use a scrubbie pad .
 Works for me!
Title: Re: Jake's Tips-N-Tricks Thread
Post by: rmichael on March 02, 2009, 08:31:20 PM
Take a scoop of "Go Jo" or "Goop" mechanic's hand cleaner and rub into your hands ( until dry) before you start painting... any paint on your hands will come off easily the next time you wash them... like at lunch time..  ;)
Title: Re: Jake's Tips-N-Tricks Thread
Post by: Vin on April 23, 2009, 04:48:27 PM
I was just using some oil base primer and didn't have any thinner but did have a can of WD-40 and it took every bit of the paint off my hands, I then washed with soapy water and my hands are spotless, not sure anyone posted this yet.
Title: Re: Jake's Tips-N-Tricks Thread
Post by: Jake on April 30, 2009, 08:40:10 PM
Vinny!!!

What up brutha!

Man, this is my first post in awhile. I just moved back to Minneapolis from Vegas about 3 weeks ago. Super different than the desert!

Anyway....

Been grinding the paint off of a 100 year old house for the last two weeks... We'll be oil priming the old wood at the beginning of next week, then a shot o latex for the Budda's belly.

I already did the priming on the garage (after grrrrrinding the heck out of it)...

Still have oil on my nails........

Thanks for the tip RM and BJ!!!!  ;)
Title: Re: Jake's Tips-N-Tricks Thread
Post by: decoman on May 01, 2009, 04:22:43 PM
Here's a sweet new trick I just learned today from a 20 year vet and I think it's pretty cool...

"Smooth edge cut bucket from a gallon can."

If you've ever cut from a gallon can, you know that paint gets in the lip, it's messy because of the lip, the lip sucks (no pun intended).... etc.

If you're right handed, take the pointed end of your 5 in 1... place the palm of your left hand in the part of the 5 you scrape naps with, punch it into the lip of a can like you're using an old time can opener, and simply (just like those old can openers) sort of see/saw it around the lip.

Be careful when you get to the end as you can easily cut yourself when the lip comes off of the edge.

Take the blade of your 5 and smooth any jagged edges down.

Viola... Smooth and easy cut bucket in about 30 seconds.

Tried it today and it worked great!  8)



we have been using the old can opener for a while all tho my guys don't like the smooth edge cut.. oh well.. ::)
Title: Re: Jake's Tips-N-Tricks Thread
Post by: Vin on May 07, 2009, 12:14:35 AM
Take a scoop of "Go Jo" or "Goop" mechanic's hand cleaner and rub into your hands ( until dry) before you start painting... any paint on your hands will come off easily the next time you wash them... like at lunch time..  ;)

like at lunch time..


I never stop and eat I shove food in my mouth and keep on RUNNIN  ;D ;D ;D

Right on Jake good to see you back I kinda figured you moved to bad man I never could get it together and get to the desert for a visita, stay warm HEH HEH.
Title: Re: Jake's Tips-N-Tricks Thread
Post by: Spencer on February 07, 2010, 02:17:53 PM
Hey Jake.  Spencer in New Zealand here with a request from you or anyone who knows.  I have a "Blonding" job for an interior.  Some call it "Whitewash".  Whatever you call it, I have to coat a full interior of a timber home, leaving a slight white over timber look allowing the grain to come through but STOPPING the tannins leaking out of the timber.  I have had mixed success in the past, using a white oil stain, then a water-based satin urethane for final coating.  Some tannins still come through, leaving a slight yellow effect (not desirable) around knots.  The timber is Pine (Macrocarpa).  All thoughts, Opinions, Ideas are welcome.  Cheers.  Spencer.
Title: Re: Jake's Tips-N-Tricks Thread
Post by: BrushJockey on February 07, 2010, 03:02:15 PM
Tough call- Forget the waterborne- won't help you at all. Just an idea- a clear oil with paint as the pigment, figure out the proportions.
 Another possibility is to use Universal clear shellac with a mix of pigmented bin as the colorant. that will stop the tannin well, then top coat with oil  finish of choice. Stinks like hell and dries fast, but will hold 'er back. You could also use the shellac after the stain, but I don't think it makes a good top coat.

Brushing or spraying? I would assume brushing- I've done some log home int and there are so many nooks and crannies it almost has to be at least backbrushed.

Good luck with that one! 
Title: Re: Jake's Tips-N-Tricks Thread
Post by: BrushJockey on June 20, 2010, 09:33:28 PM
Trying to comply with RRP?  Here's a good set of videos on how

http://www.youtube.com/user/TheWXTV (http://www.youtube.com/user/TheWXTV)
Title: Re: Jake's Tips-N-Tricks Thread
Post by: chrisn on June 21, 2010, 02:56:04 AM
and all this is going to cost us aprox $38 per job  :o :o :o :o :o
Title: Re: Jake's Tips-N-Tricks Thread
Post by: A New Leaf Painting on November 04, 2014, 03:04:14 PM
I'm going to have to try the wallpaper trick. I've thought about that in the past but didn't take the time to investigate. Very nice!

 Painters Jacksonville FL (http://www.anewleafpainting.com)
Title: Re: Jake's Tips-N-Tricks Thread
Post by: chrisn on November 04, 2014, 05:58:46 PM
What trick is that?  (wallpaper?)
Title: Re: Jake's Tips-N-Tricks Thread
Post by: Straight Edge Painting on March 18, 2015, 06:05:02 AM
I love ideas like this.  I always misplace my rag so I made a lighter leash thingy into a rag holder. Now I always have my rag!  ;D

interior painting ponte vedra beach fl  (http://www.straightedgepaintingllc.com)
Title: Re: Jake's Tips-N-Tricks Thread
Post by: paintit.com on March 24, 2015, 06:24:41 PM
Great way to get flyers out. Put postcard size flyers in zip-lock bags with clean gravel (marble chips) in them to wait them down and so you can throw with ease. Fill several 5 gallon buckets with them and hit the road. When throwing out the window, try to hit the driveway close to the mailbox. That way it's not out of the way for the homeowners. You can cover lots of houses quick like this.
Title: Re: Jake's Tips-N-Tricks Thread
Post by: Straight Edge Painting on March 29, 2015, 06:54:27 AM
Yeah a sag happens when too much paint builds up from a cut line and it dries before it levels out...

Straight Edge Painting LLC
Home Painting Contractors (http://www.straightedgepaintingllc.com)
Title: Re: Jake's Tips-N-Tricks Thread
Post by: airclay on May 18, 2015, 08:11:01 PM
damn, it's so good to see variations on the same things I've been doing and folks have been laughing at :)
Title: Re: Jake's Tips-N-Tricks Thread
Post by: facembanidaimon on March 31, 2016, 03:08:27 PM
I carry a utility knife, a razorblade and a sanding block with me.  At the end of the day I keep them with my keys so I never forget them.  :)
Title: Re: Jake's Tips-N-Tricks Thread
Post by: mymint87 on March 31, 2016, 05:39:46 PM
Yeah a sag happens when too much paint builds up from a cut line and it dries before it levels out...

Straight Edge Painting LLC
Home Painting Contractors (http://www.straightedgepaintingllc.com)
quick tip to avoid that?...when working from a deuce or 2 gallon bucket as you load the brush and tap the sides paint builds up on the side of the bucket...load your brush from the side build up by tapping the tip of the brush against the side loading it with the built up paint, then you can cut in countertops without the sag...try it sometime
Title: Jakes Tips N Tricks Thread
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Title: Jakes Tips N Tricks Thread
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Title: Jakes Tips N Tricks Thread
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Title: Re: Jake's Tips-N-Tricks Thread
Post by: EpicFinish on February 09, 2018, 04:28:26 PM
I recently learned a nice little trick for cleaning up new pine soffits prior to applying oil based varnish.  Many times on new constructions the newly installed soffits are dingy and dirty from laying around prior to installation I.E. boot prints, oily hand prints, black marks, you name it.  I wish it weren't so.  Some very uncomfortable sanding is usually implied, either using a power sander or elbow grease while killing your neck and shoulders.  No bueno.  Turns out if you apply some of your oil base varnish to those stains as you go along with your application, and spot sand the stain the oil actually helps pull out a lot of the stain making sanding out the dirt and prints sooooo much easier.  Simply amazing vs. dry sanding.  Yes, it's a little messy as if you're using a sanding block it will get covered in product.  The benefits are worth it though.  Wish I'd known this years ago.  This allows you to do much of the clean up as you go along with your application, opposed to dry sanding everything and then coming back through a second time doing the actual applications.  It won't work on everything, but for the superficial stuff... magical.  Worth a try.  ;D