Author Topic: Primer and Paint in one on new Drywall??  (Read 22677 times)

Offline wags76

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Primer and Paint in one on new Drywall??
« on: April 25, 2010, 10:58:28 AM »
I have new drywall that needs primed and painted.  I was trying to find out whether or not I can use the Primer and Paint in one step and skip the base primer.  I'm not sure how it will turn out.  If anyone has experience with this, please help.  My only other option is to do it the old standard way and prime the walls and ceiling then go back and paint everything with the desired color.

Thanks in advance,
Chris
« Last Edit: April 25, 2010, 11:02:16 AM by wags76 »

Offline BrushJockey

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Re: Primer and Paint in one on new Drywall??
« Reply #1 on: April 25, 2010, 12:34:32 PM »
It's the acrylic resin in the paints that is also in the primers that make this possible. In simple perfect conditions, perhaps just to seal drywall this works. But there are many primers that do many things ( I usually carry about 5) . 
 Why use an expensive paint  to do what a less expensive primer will do better?
 Are you a painter?  You can tint primers to get coverage in the direction of the finish color also.
"It would be ludicrous to think I'm new to this, I know this, this is what I do"  ( Prince and Geo Clinton..)

Offline LJ

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Re: Primer and Paint in one on new Drywall??
« Reply #2 on: April 25, 2010, 06:12:21 PM »
I recently tried out a one-step coating for sheetrock from Rodda (SR Ultra Coat.)  It turned out well; sealed well, had good hide and a nice even flat sheen.  I think SW sells a similar product.  In the end, I did topcoat it with interior SuperPaint as I was only experimenting.  I'm not sure if this really addresses your question....

Offline wags76

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Re: Primer and Paint in one on new Drywall??
« Reply #3 on: April 25, 2010, 10:26:06 PM »
I was looking at the Pittsburgh primer and paint all in one (Grand Distinction), and wasn't sure if it would work on new unprimed sheetrock.  It would considerably reduce the time needed to paint the entire house.  I just wasn't sure if it would turn out just as good as the standard way of priming all the walls then going back for a second coat of regular paint with tint.

Offline rmichael

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Re: Primer and Paint in one on new Drywall??
« Reply #4 on: April 25, 2010, 10:41:55 PM »
I don't think "self priming paint" applies to new drywall, IMO new drywall requires a dedicated primer before applying the paint. Directly applying an "all in one paint" could result in peeling and blistering, especially at the mudd joints. I would strongly recommend that you prime the new drywall before painting.

Best Luck..
Pro Painter 25 years ~ Down East Coastal NC

"Hell Son, It's always been about the work."

Offline chrisn

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Re: Primer and Paint in one on new Drywall??
« Reply #5 on: April 26, 2010, 04:30:19 AM »
I agree with rmichael ;D

Offline D. Berry

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Re: Primer and Paint in one on new Drywall??
« Reply #6 on: April 28, 2010, 09:04:26 AM »
Fifteen years ago when I finished my basement I put two top coats without primer on new drywall. It looks great today. A nice finish without any problems with the paper a joints.

Offline chrisn

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Re: Primer and Paint in one on new Drywall??
« Reply #7 on: April 29, 2010, 03:51:08 AM »
Fifteen years ago when I finished my basement I put two top coats without primer on new drywall. It looks great today. A nice finish without any problems with the paper a joints.

lucky :o ;D

Offline Hangman

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Re: Primer and Paint in one on new Drywall??
« Reply #8 on: April 29, 2010, 06:20:54 PM »
I'm fairly new to this message board but I'm guessing this isn't the first time this question has been debated. There is a difference between 'primer' and 'primer-sealer'. A high build primer is helpful to cover imperfections if you have the spray rig to handle it, but when it comes to sealing the drywall I don't think most primers do any better job than a decent grade flat paint.I like to use ICI High Hide Wall primer-sealer on new drywall. It covers the bands good and sands slick. I've done countless ceilings over new drywall with two coats of ICI Ultra-Hide or SW Pro-Mar 200 flat and never have I seen any problems. Read the can on either of these products and it will tell you that for new drywall you can "prime with this product".
A man hears what he wants to hear and disregards the rest..........

Offline rmichael

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Re: Primer and Paint in one on new Drywall??
« Reply #9 on: April 29, 2010, 08:24:25 PM »
Fifteen years ago when I finished my basement I put two top coats without primer on new drywall. It looks great today. A nice finish without any problems with the paper a joints.

Fifteen years ago you were painting with much different paint..  :-\  Many solvents have been removed from today's low VOC paints, the result has been paints that are much less forgiving of surface conditions, for example drywall dust is more likely to cause blistering and peeling of the paint film and the paint may not be absorbed into super sanded mudd joints.
As professionals we have all seen changes in the way paint reacts to different surface conditions, and mostly the changes have been negative.   
Pro Painter 25 years ~ Down East Coastal NC

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Offline BrushJockey

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Re: Primer and Paint in one on new Drywall??
« Reply #10 on: April 30, 2010, 10:00:37 AM »
I just had a coat of finish flake off a patch that I was trying to get away with not priming.  Just a few years ago I could have done it, I guess not now. Backs up what rmicheal said.
"It would be ludicrous to think I'm new to this, I know this, this is what I do"  ( Prince and Geo Clinton..)

Offline Hangman

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Re: Primer and Paint in one on new Drywall??
« Reply #11 on: April 30, 2010, 05:28:14 PM »
I agree many of today's paints aren't as versatile ( for lack of a better term ) as they once were. Stories of paint flaking definitely get my attention as I'm sure they do many others who check this board. So I'll ask the question that many are probably wondering about. What do you guys like to prime new drywall with? ( I listed one of my favorites a few posts back.)
A man hears what he wants to hear and disregards the rest..........

Offline VJ1

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Re: Primer and Paint in one on new Drywall??
« Reply #12 on: April 30, 2010, 08:24:20 PM »
As rmichael said, your issue is going to be the compound. The self priming paints work fine on new drywall, but the compound absorbs the resin in the paint at a much greater rate.The result is you may see a sheen difference in the finish coat between the board and the joints. Spot prime the joints with a primer/sealer, if you dont want to do a full prime just to be on the safe side. 

Offline CarlThePainter

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Re: Primer and Paint in one on new Drywall??
« Reply #13 on: May 01, 2010, 09:36:34 AM »
I don't think spot priming really works anymore either.   Since the paint will seal better/worse than the actual primer you are priming with, those spot primed areas may flash, especially on walls with critical light.   For me, it is a full prime or nothing.

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Re: Primer and Paint in one on new Drywall??
« Reply #14 on: May 01, 2010, 10:57:22 AM »
Up here they cut out the painter altogether in the cookie-cutter tract and apartment (new const) biz. Texture coats applied by the drywall guys are mixed with paint.

Trim is factory finished (MDF mostly  :P ), and the painter is left out of the loop.

Yes, looks like fecal matter and does not touch up. I have "repaired" a few of these in my time.